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13th March 2017

Precise technique tracks dopamine in the brain

Filed under: Biology,tracks dopamine — Tags: , — BiBi @ 10:27 am

Precise technique tracks dopamine in the brain

New sensor could reveal the neurotransmitter’s role in learning and habit formation.

http://news.mit.edu/2017/precise-technique-tracks-dopamine-brain-0303

14th December 2016

Biologists unravel drug-resistance mechanism in tumor cells

Filed under: Biology,tumor cells — Tags: , , — BiBi @ 2:12 pm
Biologists unravel drug-resistance mechanism in tumor cells

Targeting the RNA-binding protein that promotes resistance could lead to better cancer therapies.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
October 22, 2015

  • P53, which helps healthy cells prevent genetic mutations, is missing from about half of all tumors. Researchers have found that a backup system takes over when p53 is disabled and encourages cancer cells to continue dividing. In the background of this illustration are crystal structures of p53 DNA-binding domains.

    P53, which helps healthy cells prevent genetic mutations, is missing from about half of all tumors. Researchers have found that a backup system takes over when p53 is disabled and encourages cancer cells to continue dividing. In the background of this illustration are crystal structures of p53 DNA-binding domains.

    Image: Jose-Luis Olivares/MIT (p53 illustration by Richard Wheeler/Wikimedia Commons)

NASA gives MIT a humanoid robot to develop software for future space missions

Filed under: IT,Mars,robot,space — Tags: , , , , — BiBi @ 2:02 pm
NASA gives MIT a humanoid robot to develop software for future space missions

Team led by Professor Russ Tedrake of CSAIL to develop algorithms for 6-foot-tall “Valkyrie” robot to travel to Mars and beyond.

http://news.mit.edu/2015/nasa-gives-mit-humanoid-robot-future-space-missions-1117

16th March 2016

How cancer cells fuel their growth

Filed under: Biology,Science — Tags: , , — BiBi @ 1:04 pm

Scientists surprised to find amino acids, not sugar, supply most building blocks for tumor cells.

Scientists had believed that most of the cell mass that makes up new cells, including cancer cells, comes from that glucose. However, MIT biologists have now found, to their surprise, that the largest source for new cell material is amino acids, which cells consume in much smaller quantities.

Anne Trafton | MIT News Office
March 7, 2016

http://news.mit.edu/2016/how-cancer-cells-fuel-their-growth-0307

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